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. >> thank you, jim, for that. >>> president obama says it's not always up to the u.s. to step in when there's turmoil overseas. but in a preview to his national address on monday, the president says the current crisis in libya demands america's attention. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there's a crisis somewhere in the world. but i firmly believe that when innocent people are being brutalized, when someone like gadhafi threatens a bloodbath that could destabilize a national region, then it's in our national interest to act. >> nbc's mike viqueira is our national correspondent on alex. >> what prompted the president to speak out on monday? >> after criticism from the left and the right, democrats and republicans here in washington. the president is suffering from two perceptions here, alex. first, this came very suddenly. usually when americans start to see tomahawks flying off or airplanes in flight drops dropping smart bombs, it comes after weeks if not months of debate. there was no such -- there was no such action. secretary of state hillary clinton was i
of the union with candy crowley" starts right now. >>> why in the world is the u.s. military involved in libya? republicans are the toughest critics. there are echos inside the democratic party. >> i really don't believe that we have an obligation to get involved in every single occurrence in that part of the world. >> the immediate thing congress needs to do when it returns is to cut off any funds for containing libya. >> in a statement senator j. rockefeller wrote of serious concerns. our military and budget are stretched thin fighting two wars already. and i want to avoid getting into another conflict with unknown cost and consequences. tomorrow night, the president addresses the nation. today, a muddled mission against gadhafi. we talked to armed services carl levin and chaos throughout the mideast with former national security adviser stephen hadley and the former head of the cia, general michael hayden. and then assessing growing concern over japan's nuclear disaster with nuclear analyst joseph sorincioni and the impact on this with economist alice rivlin and douglas holtz aiken. i'm can
. >>> this sunday, the allied strike against libya stretches into its second week as the u.s. seeks to limit its role. >> responsibility for this operation is being transferred from the united states to our to allies and partners. >> but as criticism from congress mounts, many questions remain. what happens if gadhafi clings to power? what are the limits of the u.s.'s role if a civil war gets worse? and how does a military campaign relate to our overall strategy in the mideast? this morning, a special joint interview. with us, the secretary of state hillary clintonrt the president faces critics from both sides of the aisle. did he overstep his constitutional authority by using force without consulting congress. my exclusive interview this morning with the ranking member of the community, republican from indiana, senator richard lugar. >>> finally, analysis of the administration's handling of the crisis in libya is our fragile economic recovery continues and our military is stretched thin by two other wars, did the president make the case to the american people that the intervention in libya is w
obama from the east room of the white house essentially saying the u.s. will help lead the international enforcement of a no-fly zone over libya. he also took some time there outlining what american forces will not be doing. >> the united states is not going to deploy ground troops into libya and we are not going the use force to go beyond a well-defined goal. >> in moments i'll be speaking live with nic robertson in libya and wolf blitzer about who makes the next move here. that's in just a moment. we're also learning here as we're staying on top of the story in japan, we're learning trace amounts of radiation have reached the united states' west coast, all the way from this fukushima daiichi power plant in japan. so i'll be speaking with the mayor of los angeles shortly. and we'll find out what the new danger rating is right around fukushima, where that power plant is still out of control here. it's been one week to the day after the earthquake and tsunami hit. looked at this video here, video that was flagged for us, showing some of the new views we're getting from the powerful tsunam
is preparing his own take on the u.s. role in the war. >>> also this morning, new fears in japan as radiation levels reach stunning new heights, and the air around the damaged nuclear plant is no longer the worry. rather, it's the water. >>> also something we're keeping an eye on right now in great britain. budget cuts are coming at a high cost for british leaders. protesters on the streets this morning clashing with police officers over proposed austerity measures. we'll have the latest from there. again, this is happening right now. from the cnn center, this is your cnn start morning for this march the 26th. i'm t.j. holmes. we do want to start with a new and disturbing incident in tripoli. this happened today. it's a story that maybe highlights the brutality of a regime that so many people are now fighting against. we want to bring in our cnn international correspondent nic robertson with the latest. tell us what happened. >> reporter: well, t.j., it all began this morning over breakfasttime when a lady came into the hotel, a middle aged appeared to be very respectable lady came into the h
. phoenix, arizona on our line for republicans. what should the president say on the u.s. involvement in libya on monday? caller: if he's the intelligent president i want him to tell us why we're going into libya and not the sudan and not bahrain. i think it's un:tionable to open another front when we're spending millions a day on iraq and afghanistan and 50% of our revenue goes to defense. host: the sudan would be another front, too. caller: we could help solve that with humanitarian aid. with the cost in fossil fuels, if we paid the actual cost that fossil fuels cost us, we would pay $12.50 a gallon for gasoline because these wars are about oil. what i'm saying is if he's the innocent president then why doesn't he talk about -- intelligent president why doesn't he talk about the bahrain or sudan? he's doing it for oil just like the last -- just like the iraq war. and i think we need to question why we're doing these things. if we want to help people resisting and trying for democracy, let's do that. but let's not be hidden about our agenda.
libya's air defenses. the u.s. and british military fired a total of 124 tomahawk cruise missiles. u.s. officials say they are getting ready to hand over operational control of the military mission. >> we expect in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we'll be a member of the coalition. we'll have a military role in the coalition. we will not have the pre-eminent role. >> let's get the military perspective on this from cnn's pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. let's start with secretary gates pledge to hand over control in just a couple days. first, what exactly does that mean and is it realistic? >> what it means is they are looking now to set up some sort of structure by which another entity could take control that could be nato although i've been told by a source that there is some reluctance to fly under a nato flag and another thing is so up a separate command and control structure. in one key area u.s. participation may have already peaked this morning. i was told just this morning by an offi
a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according to u.s. officials, coalition strikes have successfully crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no-fly zone is effectively in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's tripoli compound last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown. he has vowed to fight a long, drawn out war with western forces. making the rounds on the sunday talk shows, admiral mike mullen stressed that the u.s. role in libya would be limited but he did not give an exact date of how long the u.s. would remain involved. >> there's no one that understands better than i that the stress and the strain that we've been under for a long time in our tenth year of war, both in iraq and in afghanistan. that said, we are within our capability and capacity to be able to execute this mission. the directions have been given to me, it is limited. it is very focused and in that regard, we're more than able, as has been shown
for the u.s. in the battle against al qaeda and several hundred loyalists, still scattered around yemen, back country and, seizure of that weapons plant is a blow in that fight. president obama is preparing to address the situation in libya tomorrow night and his decision to intervene has been criticized from both sides of the aisle, some say it came too late. others argue, we shouldn't be involved at all and the president defending his move, saying this weekend it this our national interest. what does the president need to say to get the country on board. david drucker joins us from "roll call", to say it is in our national interest, that is a stretch? >> i don't think it is a stretch but the president has to forcefully and clearly make the case, i think the problem he has had is he did not address the nation on television the moment we went into libya on that saturday and this is something the emerging market have some to expect from presidents -- >> gregg: he's doing it under pressure now. >> i don't know if that is it or, in his mind now is the time. one of the problems the presiden
a nationwide review to see if u.s. plants are vulnerable to the same type of earthquake that hit japan. the indian point station is about 25 miles from new york city has two operating nuclear reactors and it sits right on top of the ramapo fault line. the nrc filed a report uncovering a higher safety risk at the plant than previously thought. and that's gotten the attention of new york governor andrew cuomo, a long-time opponent of indian point. >> the world has changed. reevalua reevaluate. reevaluate and look at the situation and decide whether or not you should grant this facility a license today. with what you know today. >> now, we had a chance to speak with officials from energy corp. on our show last week. they say they welcome a safety review. 27 nuclear reactors, including indian point have been singled out for inspections by the nrc. allan chernoff has been granted exclusive access inside the indian point plant and we'll have his report coming up in the next hour of "american morning." >>> another morning of explosions in tripoli and heavy aircraft fire. as of last night, the
then become the largest class action employment suit in u.s. history. walmart, america's largest private employer, says, no, the class would be too big, the plaintiffs too dissimilar, the issues too many to litigate. the plaintiffs say walmart wants a big company exception to civil rights 0 law. two lower federal courts have ruled the class and case can go forward. that brings us to the supreme court where we now have three women justices, the most ever. cnn's kate bolduan has been following the case for us and joins us to recap the arguments. kate, good to see you. any sign that the women justices were at all receptive to the plaintiffs? >> reporter: that's very interesting. i would say, first off, that it did seem in the courtroom with the aggressive question you did hear from the female justices, that they were receptive to the women's claims to the sides of the plaintiffs. but, as i just said, there are three women on this court. so what it's looking like -- we always have to give it a huge caveat here because of course we never know until the justices rule -- from the commentary and
to take control of the sky over libya. possibly changing the role for u.s. troops in that region, and president obama is preparing his remarks on the situation there. >>> and running for cover in the middle east. protesters in syria met with a hail of gunfire. is that the next domino to fall? from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn "saturday morning." thank you for spending part of your weekend with us. we do want to start in japan right now where there is growing concerns over radiation levels in the ocean near that damaged nuclear plant, but there is some positive news as well from the fukushima plant. radiation levels in the air seem to be decreasing. cnn's paula hancocks live in tokyo. paula, hello. sounds like good news/bad news. let's start with the bad news. >> reporter: that's right, t.j. well, this is the water in the sea just off the coast of the fukushima nuclear plant. according to japan's nuclear safety agency, the levels of radioactive iodine are more than 1,200 levels than they should be. a cause for alarm. we're hearing from the agency it's only
. and the biggest demonstrations and rolling out i'm told in 20 european cities, at least 36 u.s. cities plan for similar type union sympathizing demonstrations in this country, whereof course, this is an extension of what happened not only in portugal last week, where austerity measures were rejected by the parliament and everything went kablewy and this is wisconsin and the union crackdown there, but they're all united in this one respect, they're ticked. and if unions win there, is that trouble for us here everywhere? after this. what does it take to fly? it takes knowing we have our work cut out for us. but if you run before the wind you can't take off. you've got to turn into it. the thing you push against lifts you up. so, every challenge is a chance to show that even in this crazy world of no liquids and route cancellations someone still has the passenger's back. and along the way we'll prove we're not just building a bigger airline we're building a better one. >> all right. still keeping sour eye on london right now. thanks got a little violent today and this is a sort of global demo
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
. the president talks about the operation in libya. do we hear more about the u.s. mission there? >>> the winter that would not quit. in some parts of the country, more snow and one spot nearing a spectacular record. >>> look out below. some harrowing moments for one skier who captures his ordeal on the ski slopes on camera. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc saturday." breaking news from the front lines in libya rebels have won a major battle this morning, pushing west from benghazi, maintained control of ajdabiya. allied jets made the difference in ending the week-long battle with government forces. this is a brit tissue jet on friday bombing tanks shelling the city from the outskirts. we are in tripoli. good morning, john. i understand you have information about a disturbing incident at a hotel that's housing the international media. can you tell us what happened? >> reporter: that's right. it is a disturbing incident over breakfast. we are pretty well guarded by gadhafi security forces here. they won't let us out. but somehow this morning, a woman, her name is iman
the humanitarian crisis, protect civilians on the ground from moammar gadhafi's forces, but the u.s. position is to have moammar gadhafi leave. secretary of state hillary clinton who and on "meet the press" with gates had the following to say on that score. >> we will provide a very clear messe gaafute' soenng msapear do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> reporter: so again, alex, the president is here in washington at the white house over the course of this weekend preparing for that address tomorrow 7:30 eastern time here in washington. >> mike viqueira at the white house, we'll see you again. msnbc will have live coverage of the presidential address tomorrow evening 7:30 eerng time. >>> let's go to the situation on the ground where rebel forces are breezing through cities held by gadhafi forces as recently as yesterday. the rebels now hold the oil towns of ras lanuf and are pushing westward, a bit closer to tripoli. let's go live to tripoli and jim maceda. the rebels are not facing too muc
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
the transition from u.s. command has been seemless, but there are still serious questions about the u.s. involvement moving forward, what to do about the rebels, of course, reports of the cia, on the ground. this as lawmakers remain divided over our role there. >> they are clearly in violation of the act that sets three and only three conditions under which the president can commit armed forces. one them is declaration war, authorization of congress, there's been none and three is a national emergency caused by an attack on united states territories, possessions or armed forces. there has been none. so this is clearly illegal. martha: there has been so much discussion over getting approval from congress for what is going on on the ground in libya, and right now we are watching some unfolding testimony in front of the house armed services committee, secretary of defense robert gates, and also we want to play for you a comment moments ago from the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen. let's listen to what he had to say: >> we have continued to strike at qaddafi's mil
or airplanes. he stressed the u.s. is diplomatically supporting the no-fly zone, not the enforcement itself. no american troops on the ground, no american planes, no enforcement itself, that's what we know. what we don't know is a lot bigger. joining us now, eugene robinson, pulitzer prize winning columnist for "the washington post." thanks for being here. >> good evening, chris. >> what do you make of president obama's remarks on libya today? are we now at war? was that the communication? even coming away from it, i had a hard time answering that question for myself. >> when i heard the president's speech, i thought gee, we might be, and here is why. he said very clearly that as far as he's concerned and the united states is concerned, gadhafi has lost the legitimacy to lead. he forfeited the right to be president of libya, and he set these demands, gadhafi has to stop, he has to withdraw, these are not negotiable and there will be consequences. so that to me says we are going to use force to make gadhafi do what we want him to do. >> and of course, if he doesn't do what we want him to do,
? >> reporter: no. it's not what the u.s. was hoping he'd say. it's not what the syrian people were hoping he'd say, or the rest of the middle east that was looking toward the speech as really a significant benchmark to which direction syria would go. carol, this was a defiance speech. no major concessions and the message here was loud and clear. this is about survival of the regime of bashar al assad and clear, too, he wanted to stay and fight the emergency law that everyone fought. maybe he is actually going to lift it. did not happen. so that means the regime is able to use a very serious and dangerous tool where they can just detain people at their own whims and keep people in check that way. i spoke to one analyst who said if you're anyone in damascus today and you heard that speech you would probably think twice before getting out on the streets to demonstrate because the security services have a brutal history of cracking down really hard. the syrians know the reality on the ground. and it can be dire consequences. >> it sounds so much like what happened in egypt. it's eerie. how worri
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
upper level winds that actually transport that into parts of kansas, the u.s., and many other places. and before all is said and done, i would not be surprised if you could find trace amounts of this all the way over to europe. but i have to tell you, this is very, very harmless. this is not a big deal. if you're walking out to your car in bright sunlight, chances are you might be exposed to more radiation than that than these particles across the globe. >> it does still, of course, make you think twice when you hear about it. but hearing it's harmless is good. >>> in a few minutes, we'll be talking more about all of this with a disaster expert about containment efforts in japan. he led numerous expeditions into some of the most contaminated areas of chernobyl. >>> to libya now, and rebels getting closer to moammar gadhafi's doorstep gaining ground with new coalition air strikes. nato now says it will take over the entire military mission there, not just the no-fly zone. so far the u.s. has supplied nearly all the fire power according to pentagon figures. the u.s. military has launch
of america has done what we said we would do. >> ok. so last night, he was talking about my leadership. u.s. led. go back 10 days ago, we didn't hear that. listen to this montage. >> in this effort, the united states is prepared to act as part of an international coalition. american leadership is essential. but that does not mean acting alone. in this effort, the united states is acting with a broad coalition. make no mistake, today we are part of a broad coalition. our goal is focused. our cause is just. and our coalition is strong. >> well, so that's the president as he evolved into this position and i think one of the many columnists who looked to the speech and analyzed the speech and said it best, this is a good speech if he said it 11 days ago, he would have quieted 95% of the critics. i would have found a way to give the secretary of state some credit. >> no kidding. she got him into this thing. >> it's amazing how much stuff you can do if you don't mind who gets the credit. that would have been a perfect time with hillary clinton leading -- secretary of state hillary clinton leadi
and there are clear signs of headway on two fronts. no more need for cruise missiles since in the words of one u.s. official we now have air dominance. coalition forces can fly to their targets in jets having little to fear from the bombed out defenses of the regime. if you're counting, the allies fired 162 tomahawk missiles since saturday. the vast majority american. if carried out 175 sorties since yesterday. behind the scenes we may be nearing a breakthrough in the back and forth over command and control. the u.s. and britain won a leading role for nato. france and arab nations don't. now it seems nato will coordinate the troops and hardware while political leaders call the shots. they're due to meet tuesday in london. >>> moammar gadhafi is vaui is o fight on. i want to bring in cnn national security analyst peter bergen to talk about this. good to have you with us. let's start by talking about the opposition. we heard so much about the rebels on the ground in libya. what do you know about them and do you know if they can be trusted? >> well, let's start with the fact that the u.s. government
to remove gadhafi from power using military force. instead top u.s. officials are working diplomatic channels to try and push the dictator o. hiarcltoonme t a very clear message to gadhafi, but we're also sending a message to people around him. do you really want to be a pariah? do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> mike viqueira, good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning action al alex. >> what else are we hearing? >> reporter: critics say there's something of a mixed message coming from the administration since the military action started a week ago yesterday. it's not only republicans, it's democrats as well. the administration on the one hand has a need to play to the arab street, but they're also now trying to play to main street here in the united states. they have emphasized all along that this is an international coalition that includes arab nations. at one point secretary clinton said we are not in the lead but clearly the united states has been in the lead. they
the effort to topple a dictatorship. with the u.s. currently involved in afghanistan, iraq, and providing large-scale humanitarian assistance in japan, it does not diminish." collins of maine said this. "i remain troubled that the president did not seek congressional consent in the absence of a national emergency. libya does not affect our country's vital interest." the president talked about who will lead and when. here is what he had to say. >> this transfer from the united states to nato will take place on wednesday. going forward, the lead in enforcing the no-fly zone and protecting civilians on the ground will transition to our allies and partners. i'm fully confident that our coalition will keep the pressure on gaddafi's remaining forces. in that effort, the united states will play a supporting role, including intelligence, logistical support, search and rescue assistance, and capabilities to jam regime communications. because of this transition to a broader nato-based coalition, the risk and cost of this operation to our military and to american taxpayers will be reduced significan
. violence rips law the middle east and the arab world. and now the u.s. is handed over control of the no-fly zone to nato but the u.s. military is still deeply involved. so what is going on? a live report moments away. and a muslim teacher asks for three weeks off to go on a pilgrimage and the school says "no way," she did not work there long enough and the department of justice is suing the school. what is up with that? >> states want to tax big corporations to fix their deficit instead of changing policy so now one big company, caterpillar, employs thousands of people, is ready to flee illinois. could this happen in your state? we continue right now with "fox and friends" this morning. >> welcome, everyone. you are watching "fox and friends" today. >> welcome to "fox and friends" on saturday morning. thank you for waking up with us. that is dave briggs and heather is here and i am clayton. >> lots going on today. >>dave: we start with new developments in libya where rebels have retaken the key town of ajdabiya after a fierce battle with muammar qaddafi forces and rick is live inside th
said in a potential intervention would come with regret. u.s. and allied forces meeting in paris to talk about potential military action. president obama said yesterday that the united states will take part in a no-flight effort. -- no-fly effort. we want to get your thoughts on the u.s. joined the no-fly effort. here is how you can contribute this morning. here iare the numbers at the bottom of your screen. the president announcing yesterday in a statement about the united states supporting a no-fly zone. this has been done by several allies. we will take a look at the headlines on "washington journal" this morning. mr. obama sketched out an american military role. -- rule. you have probably seen other headlines this morning as well. meetings are going on to talk about the strategy with the united states and other allied forces. the president made the statement yesterday about joining the no- fly zone effort. he spoke about what the united states will not do. here is what he had to say. >> i want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the united states is not going to depl
john mccain wants the u.s. and others to arm the rebels. he says the president needs to clarify the purpose, the costs and duration of the operation. >> this policy has been characterized by confusion and indecision and delay. it is no wonder that americans are confused as to what our policy is. on the one hand, they say it is humanitarian and the other hand they say gadhafi must go. >> president obama will speak on the libyan mission tonight. he will speak from the national defense university in washington. we get started at 7:00 p.m. eastern. 4:00 out west. >>> in london, british prime minister david cameron is making a statement on the libyan opposition. he is organizing for a transition process. a conference will be held in london tomorrow. it is designed to outline the political framework for the way ahead in libya. >>> now the syrian government may bow to protesters and demands analyst the emergency law that has been in place for 50 years now. the president is expected to address the nation soon and dozens of protesters have been killed since demonstrations began just nine
this morning from a top u.s. official on the american mission in libya. nbc's david gregory asked defense secretary robert gates about our involvement in the conflict in an interview that will air on "meet the press" later this morning. >> is libya in our vital interest as a country? >> no, i don't think it's a vital interest for the united states, but we clearly have interests there, and it's a part of the region which is a vital interest for the united states. >> secretary gates joins secretary of state hillary clinton on today's "meet the press," so check your local listings for that. tomorrow, we will have live coverage of president obama's address to the nation at 7:30 p.m. eastern time. >>> and there is word from syria this morning that 12 people have been killed in violence rocking a seaside mediterranean city. the government says the victims include security forces and residents. this amateur video obtained by the "associated press" was allegedly shot on friday, in which it shows protesters trying to topple a statue of former president assad. in yemen, the president warns of a des
and 19 miles to evacuate. you remember the u.s. evacuation zone is 50 miles away from the fukushima plant. now they are expanding it to get closer to where we are on this. so far the evacuation is voluntary, it could become mandatory if the conditions get worse. as we mentioned at the top of this hour there are fears that there could be a genuine breach in one of those nuclear reactors. as soon as we get more on that we will bring it right to you. and this week america's top prosecutor attorney general eric holder met with police chiefs to discuss the rising danger to police across this country. according to the latest statistics 50 enforcement officers were killed in the line of duty through march 24th of this year. that come mayor with 45 in the same period of 2010. this has been on the rise. there is a new push to protect those who work so hard and put their lives on the line to protect us. doug mckelway is live with more on this. good afternoon, doug. >> reporter: good afternoon, martha. what is most disturbing about that it is occurring at a time when violent crime and murder is gene
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
on the ground were the clearest indication that intensive air strikes carried out by the u.s., french and naval assets over the past week have softened up the libyan military considerably. meanwhile, the front page of " the new york times" - below the fold in the new york times, there's a story on the event recovered live on c-span yesterday. this is prompting us to ask republicans to define what will define the gop primary. with that, republicans only -- 202 the area code. our first call is from ardmore, oklahoma. caller: good morning. i believe the people of united states, their first concern is the economy. another thing we have to be concerned about is full disclosure. in this administration under obama, there has never been such hit in things. he spends money like going to brazil and giving out this money. they owe us tons of money. under the clinton years clinton lent them $100 billion. it goes on and on and on. when did congress lose the power of the purse? the other thing which is the greatest thing in our nation is we have to come back to god and of this nation repents if my people cal
hear last week, general carter hamm leading the u.s. effort there to enforce the no-fly zone, describing misrata specifically and saying it was very difficult to know exactly where the opposition was, exactly where the government was, exactly where the civilians were and exactly where these heavy weapons were because they are hideing in houses. as we drove out of misrata yesterday we saw soldiers with their vehicles hiding inside buildings, inside buildings. they had driven in through the store fronts and hiding inside the stores and the tanks hiding under trees, so this makes it very, very hard for aircraft to see these heavy weapons and to target them easily without the fear of injuring civilians and that is the challenge that these aircraft flying overhead are facing right now, carol. >> nic robertson reporting live in tripoli, thanks. >>> president obama goes on television to face a war weary nation that would be our own, he says ignoring moammar gadhafi threats of slaughtering civilians would have betrayed our values as americans, but he said using the military to force
: but with allies lacking the firepower to take out strategic targets, officials say the u.s. military has shouldered the bulk of the mission thus far. >> there was no question that we were leading in the first phase. >> reporter: now nato has agandf the other, more difficult task of protecting civilians on the ground. >> this operation has already saved many lives, but the danger is far from over. >> reporter: but while the allied mission aims to keep gadhafi at bay, the president's own goal goes further. >> moammar gadhafi has lost legitimacy to lead and he must leave. >> reporter: saturday at a conservative conference in iowa, mr. obama's libya policy came under attack from republicans. >> reveals the utter lack of clarity in the president's thinking. >> reporter: in his address to the nation tomorrow, experts say the president must explain how the coalition operation helps meet the administration goal of seeing gadhafi leave power. >> we have other policy options to attain our own objectives that are separate from the u.n. mandate, and i think the president's going to have to make that
the country on u.s. action with libya with critics on both sides of the aisle hammering about the plan. what does he need to say? a former presidential speech write are is here next. >> dave: getting bang for their buck. radio shack, make ago unusual offer. buy satellite tv, get a gun. good idea? we report you decide. >> clayton: sometimes you want to shoot your tv. your cable. introducing the thunderbolt by htc. immense power. scorching speed. the first phone strong enough to run on the fastest, most advanced 4g network in america. the two trains and a bus rider. the "i'll sleep when it's done" academic. for 80 years, we've been inspireby you. and we've been honored to walk with you to help you get where u want to be. ♪ because your moment is now. let nothing stand in your way. ♪ [ giggles ] let nohey, max.nd in your way. [ announcer ] you can help significantly extend your dog's healthy years. a groundbreaking 14-year study by purina... proves that puppy chow, then dog chow nutrition, fed properly over a lifetime, can help extend his lovable antics up to 1.8 healthy years. long live yo
that the u.s. intervened to prevent the slaughter of civilians. before we show you more of what he had to say let's go rapid fire around the table. pat buchanan, five seconds or less, how would you characterize the president's speech? >> left more questions open than answered. >> donny deutsche? >> i thought it was fantastic. >> of course you did. >> he looked like a leader and showed power of track cattle. >> i think it was solid. and holes in others. >> i still don't get his attempts to explain it why we don't go into syria again and another country. >> that was the question left unanswered. speaking in washington last night the president insisted not taking action would have been a betrayal of who we are as americans. >> if we waited one more day, benghazi, a city nearly the size of charlotte,ed the conscience the world. it was not in our national interest to let that happen. i refused to let that happen. >> he ruled out targeting moammar gadhafi. warning that trying to oust him militarily would be a mistake as costly as the war in iraq. >> if we tried to overthrow gadhafi by force, our co
even though libya is not vital to u.s. interests? that's the question. joining us now, dick morris, former advisor to president clinton and the author of the new book "revolt." all right. that's the question for you. >> well, i think that -- i wrote this in a column on my web site dickmorris.com. this guy is playing checkers when he should be playing chess. he's moving the pieces one at a time without thinking five moves down the road. so ok, we're intervening from the air to protect civilians from mass slaughter. all right, that's good right now. now, what happens if we can't get rid of qaddafi and he continues to slaughter the people? you're going to send in ground troops or just say, ok, now we'll turn a blind eye. let's say we get rid of qaddafi and then an iraq style civil war breaks out where his cronies and political party goes underground challenging the rebels with ongoing terrorist tactics like happened in iraq. are we going to turn a blind eye to that? at what point do you disengage. at what point do the libyan rebels take over and turn out to be heavily infiltrated by a
president william millar. frank gaffney talks about the u.s. response to the civil war in libya. and a look at the problem of bullying in schools with francisco negron of the national school board association. >> video this morning courtesy of al-jazeera. this is the nuclear reactor in japan. according to the associated press, an explosion there destroyed a building housing the reactor. and also there are fears that it could melt down after being hit by the earthquake and tsunami there in japan. again, those reports saying that large amounts of radiation were coming out in the evacuation around the plant expanded. but officials didn't know how dangerous at this time the leak was to people. again that courtesy there from al-jazeera this morning of the plant. now, in related use, there are also reports this morning as far as those who are affected, 1,300 dead, 2,000 people in emergency shelters. as you see there, people waiting on top of buildings to be rescued by various means this morning. this courtesy of n.h.k. and also there and 50,000 emergency crews. we registered in findin
life. for a woman in any country, in the u.s., egypt, libya, to come out and say she was raped. no one would do that unless they were raped especially in a conservative society. human rights watch have said girls and women who are survivors of rape are taken to because of the shame associated with rape. and these are centers where the girls and women are held as prisoners basically because -- >> they're not rehabilitated. >> social rehabilitation centers. >> held away from the rest of society. >> they're practically prisoners. >> that's the part that's most amazing. you've told you that sources say she's being held still even though they claim she's been set free. >> her mother and relatives have appeared on television and said that libyan officials have told them if she retracts the story, they'll release her. but gives me hope she's alive. but i won't believe she's alive until i see her. i was a journalist in libya, i went with a group of journalists in 1996, and they kept us in a hotel practically prisoners of gadha gadhafi's ministry of information. and during a news conference bec
that the u.s. finally got involved. the majority of americans believe that was the right move. i said last week, you can't criticize the president on that. it's the timing. it's the timing of this issue and then what was the full fledged mission down the road. and you start adding up now the costs, this is what i think is going to wake up america. do you know that already, this has cost us $1 billion? each one of those tomahawk missiles, 140 of them ohave bee used. $30 million a piece. that f-15 that crash landed $30 million. what about the united states starts arming the rebel? we're talking about billions of dollars here. we have an economic crisis on the home front. >> let's talk about somebody else. is there any doubt in our foreign policy when you look at people that are thorns in our side, it's iran and syria. for some reason, this administration has looked at the eye doctors and said he's a reformer. he's going to bring change. i can't see any change that's good. hezbollah has been financed. hamas has been financed. their allegiance with iran has never been stronger. now, something
answer that would have satisfied speaker boehner. because i will say leading up to the u.s. intervention, the cry at that point was that the u.s. hadn't done anything. and so now that the president has acted, now there's questions there. i felt that, you know, he did explain why we went in. and he also explained what our limited role would be. and that nato has taken over the command of the no-fly zone as well as enforcing the arms embargo. >> but if -- okay, so if the president is saying that regime change is not the goal here, that it would be an ideal outcome, but that's not the goal. and yet you have hillary clinton overseas today with all these other world leaders saying, gadhafi has to go. >> i think there's two different things. i mean, frankly, what the president was saying was that our role was to essentially take the lead in the no-fly zone. and to take out gadhafi's ability to bomb the people of libya. having accomplished that, now nato takes over. and so i think what the president was describing was the limited role for our armed forces. as i understand it, secretary clinton
. >> kirk says the nuclear plant holds 1,100 t of spent fuel rods awaiting permanent storage. the u.s. to spend more than 25 years and $10 billion developing the nuclear waste repository in nevada. it is tucked away 100 mi. from the nearest population. the bickering over the use of the facility should end in order to having long term storage site for nuclear fuel rods. they hope to this form is not just political grandstanding. bulls' fever sweeping the city. black tickets on sale. >> 1200 rubber duckies vanished. >> live from the at&t chicago the official drawing of the illinois lottery. >> your winning lottery numbers for friday march 25th to does 11. best of luck. >> more than 300 cbs students showcased their science high jinks at the first annual science fair today. the fair featured everything from chemistry, physics aerospace and zoology. >> i concluded that all the medications were extremely tough active. >> the top 55 students will be invited to bring their exhibits to the center at the university of illinois in may. the top four students will be invited to bring their ex
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